From InfiniteLoom
Jump to: navigation, search

Welcome to the Infinite Loom

Threads of Philosophy

Contents

How (Not) to Use this Site

This site is intended to be used in support of lectures and further research. For class purposes, please use this site for preparation and follow up reading. However, when it comes time to compose a written assignment, please do not cite the lecture notes found here; instead, follow the links to sources, and cite the sources, especially where the sources present the primary texts of the figures in question. A citation to (InfiniteLoom) will usually be marked as inappropriate for formal written submissions.

Terms:

Reference Sources -- such as Wikipedia, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy; these are succinct summaries intended to help the reader formulate a clear overview of the works and lives of importance. Although these kinds of sources may be quoted in a formal research paper, the citations should be rare.

Course Notes and Outlines -- these are increasingly available on the internet, and they can offer helpful orientations to thinkers, lives, and histories. As with Reference Sources (above) these should be quoted sparingly, if at all.

Primary Sources -- the original works or writings of the philosopher or thinker, often in translation. These may be found at Project Gutenberg, MIT Classics, or some specialized collections. These are the sources that should predominate in introductory essays on philosophy.

Secondary Sources -- expert analysis and commentary, usually published in academic, peer-reviewed journals. These are more difficult to access on the internet, and are more appropriate for advanced course work. For students, internet access to secondary sources will most likely be facilitated via library databases.

MLA Style

Philosophy research papers should have frequent citations to sources, including "direct quotations" of key passages from primary sources. The link below presents some basic guidelines for presenting citations in MLA style.

From Purdue OWL

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/


Global Beginnings

Antiquity around the World

Africa

Ancient Africa

Middle East

Mesopotamia

Torah

India

Indus Valley

Ancient India

Ancient Hinduism

Ancient Buddhism

Ego Development

China

Three Teachings Video

Book of Songs

Daoism

Guodian

The Four Books

Mohism

Xunzi

Zen

NeoConfucianism

America

Olmec

Popol Vuh

Europe

Pre-Socratics

Athenian Genesis

Plato

Aristotle

Epicurus

Gnostics

John the Baptist

Early Christian

Jesus

Paul

John the Apostle

Egyptian Neo-Platonists

Philo of Alexandria

Plotinus

Hypatia

Talmud

Hillel

Mishnah

Babylonian Talmud

Buddhist Classics

Nagarjuna

Bodidharma

Hui-Neng

Foucault's Stoics

Seneca

Epictetus

Marcus Aurelius

From NeoPlatonism to Religion

Augustine

Benedict

Sankara

Gabirol

Islamic Classics

Messenger Mohammad

Imam Ali

Al Kindi

Ar Razi

Al Farabi

Al-Ghazali

Baghdad Peripatetics

As-Sijistani

Aristotle and Judaism

Maimonides

Aristotle and Christianity

St. Thomas Aquinas

14th Century Latins

Duns Scotus

William of Ockham

Nicholas of Autrecourt

Reformation

Karlstadt

Anabaptism

Quakers

Philosophy in Motion (17th Cent. Part I)

Galileo

Hobbes

Descartes

Newton

Spirit and Freedom (17th Cent. Part II)

Conway

Leibniz

Spinoza

Neo-Confucians (17th Cent.)

Fuzhi

Classic British Empiricism

Locke

Berkeley

Hume

American Quakers

William Penn

John Woolman

Anthony Benezet

Rights and Traditions (18th Cent.)

Rousseau

Burke

Wollstonecraft

Critical Continentals

Kant

Hegel

Marx

Utilitarianism

Bentham

Sinclair

Mill

American Transcendentalism

Emerson

Thoreau

American Democracy

Douglass

Addams

Early Existentialism

Dostoyevsky

Kierkegaard

Nietzsche

Evolutionary Pragmatism

Darwin

Peirce

Royce

James

Dewey

Depth Psychology

Freud

Jung

Buber

Buber

Phenomenology & Existentialism

Husserl

Heidegger

Arendt

Sartre

Ortega

Vienna Circle

Schlick

Sacred Hoop

Black Elk

Nonviolence

Tolstoy

Gandhi

Gender and Race

DeBeauvoir

Alain Locke

Social Gospel

Farmer

Thurman

King

Malcolm

Latin American

Quesada

Korn

Dussel

UFW

Chavez

Indian

Radhakrishnan

Vivekenanda

Critical Theory

Marcuse

Davis

Jaggar

African

Gyekye

Islamic

Tabataba'i

Khafagy

Contemporary Taoism

Alan Watts

Wei Wu Wei

New Social Contract

Rawls

Pateman

Mills

Solidarity

KOR

Gdansk Agreement

Walesa

Libertarian

Hospers

Chicana

Anzaldua

Moya

Human Rights

Mutahhari

Mernissi

Freedom

Holmstrom

Lonergan

Nishida

Disability

Fiser

Ethical Relativism

Wong

Hispanic Civil Rights

Second Wave Feminism

American Indian Movements

Queer Theory

Foucault

Butler

Contemporary Social Issues

Indian Ethics

Gregorio Cortez

Brown

Asian American

Natural Law Today

Zizek